I Had a Henri Cartier-Bresson Moment in Morocco - Los Angeles Travel Photographer

It happened in the "blue city" of Morocco and the story started with a cat, a cat that seemed to be doing yoga.  Most cats we met in Morocco were frantic, always running away, missing one eye or a part of ear and wearing scars on their faces.  In other words, I'm not impressed with them.  

So this day, when I met thy cat in the alley of one street, cleaning herself with the most difficult poses imaginable, I took an interest in her and started photographing her.  And then, bang, a boy come running in my direction...  

El fin.  

Boy-and-Cat-in-the-Alley-Chefchaouen-Morocco-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography-Verticle

Boy-and-Cat-in-the-Alley-Chefchaouen-Morocco-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography-Verticle

Visually, this image instantly reminded me of an image of Henri Cartier-Bresson that was made in Siphnos, Greece, 1961.  What do you think?

P.S. In case you are interested, here's some bonus reading about Henri Cartier-Bresson's approach to his famous "decisive moments":

 ... "he began by picking a background that already seemed interesting to him because of its texture, geometric structure or accumulated images and signs, something he defined as ‘screen’. Then he waited for children or passers-by to come along and find their place in this layout of forms, which he described as 'instant coalition'". - 
"Learn” Serendipity for More Compelling Photos by Nadia Gric.
 

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Windows in Morocco - Los Angeles Travel Photographer

When your only connection to the world is a window, what would you do? 

In Morocco, Madersas are the best opportunities, for the non-Islamic,  to admire the Islamic architecture.  At t
hese institutions for the study of Islamic theology and religious law, students would stay in small dens, with only one window opening.  While the idea is to limit the amount of distraction from outside world, I did what made sense to me and got a great view. 

Window-View-Ben-Youssef-Madersa-Marrakesh-Morocco-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography-(1)

Window-View-Ben-Youssef-Madersa-Marrakesh-Morocco-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography-(1)

You see, I had to look out my window to look into the one across from me.  Had I looked down instead of looking out, as this gentleman did, I would have missed such view and the nice lady,   

Window-View-Ben-Youssef-Madersa-Marrakesh-Morocco-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography-(2)

Window-View-Ben-Youssef-Madersa-Marrakesh-Morocco-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography-(2)

Windows are often referred to as a metaphor for opportunities.  So in light of  windows, what would you do?  

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Viva, Mexico! - Los Angeles Travel Photographer

Five years ago in Mexico city, Jose, in his sarcasm, described how only the modern development collapsed in the (infamous) 1985 earthquake, and all historical buildings stayed intact.  Back then, it was fun to laugh it off.  

Today, my heart wrenched at the sight of loss, fear and agony when the earthquake stroke central Mexico again, exactly 32 years from the last one.

Accordion-Boy-Mexico-City-Mexico-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Accordion-Boy-Mexico-City-Mexico-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

I met this boy in the historical centro part of Mexico City.  I so wished that there will be no more separation nor loss due to natural or human-inflicted disasters.    

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