Spain

Where Are You From? - Los Angeles Travel Photographer

At a village that’s surrounded by mountains that touch the clouds, we were told to hike up to its El Castillo part (also called Bulnes de Arriba).

Touching-the-Sky-Bulnes-de-Arriba-Spain-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Touching-the-Sky-Bulnes-de-Arriba-Spain-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

The castillo was what we expected to see. But instead, we bumped into him, bucket in hand.

”Where are you from?” Him in Spanish.
”America.” Me with my limited Español. (Side note: To avoid confusion, we’ve long decided to not say we are from Los Angeles in Spanish speaking countries. Go
here and you’ll know why.)

As we turned around the corner after him, we discovered beautiful vista and the happiest chicken in my opinion.

Nonetheless, I sensed a troubled cloud on his forehead somehow.

Happiest-Chicken-Bulnes-de-Arriba-Spain-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Happiest-Chicken-Bulnes-de-Arriba-Spain-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

“Peru?” Finally, he asked, minutes later.
”Huh?”
After a few back-and-forth, I realized what he meant - the Peru in the America.
”Oh, no, Estados Unidos.” Me again, putting my best foot forward in Spanish.

Relieved, off he went, leaving us with the chicken, roaming at our will. Until, we realized we had more to learn than things like where we are from - “borrowing” from your neighbors, at free will.

Do you want to know how we figured out it was not her house?

Trespassing-the-Spanish-Way-Bulnes-de-Arriba-Spain-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Trespassing-the-Spanish-Way-Bulnes-de-Arriba-Spain-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

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It was Hot in Rio Tinto - Los Angeles Travel Photographer

The day that we visited Rio Tinto, it was hot, red hot.  We saw a lady sitting under the shade of her RV by the river bank.

Rio Tinto is a river in Southwestern Spain.  It is rich in various minerals (such as copper, silver, gold, iron, etc.) and has been mined since approximately 3,000 BC.  The iron which dissolved in water gives the river its deep reddish hue. And the subsurface rocks on the river bed contain iron and sulfide minerals, which becomes obvious when parts are being exposed above water.

Rock-and-Its-Reflection-Rio-Tinto-Spain-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Rock-and-Its-Reflection-Rio-Tinto-Spain-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

When we made our rounds, it was still hot, red hot.  We asked if she could spare some icy cold water (yeah, you can tell we are from the US).  Her answer began with a disappointing no.  She then said "I have icy cold beers if you want."  She's from Germany. :-) 

Rio-Tinto-Spain-Upside-Down-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Rio-Tinto-Spain-Upside-Down-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

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Love Story in Cuenca, Spain (Part 2) - Los Angeles Travel Photographer

In the last postJulián was enlisted to fight the Italian Wars in order to improve his outlook with Inés, the girl that he was in love with.  In the weeks and months that follow, news from Julián was sporadic. 

Two years later, when the war ended, Julián, now loaded with laurels, took the shortest roads and paths to go back home.  Nothing was communicated to
Inés as he wanted to make his appearance a pleasant surprise.  Finally, on one night, he showed up at their usual time to meet in front of Inés' door, intending to thank the Christ of the Passage (el Cristo del Pasadizo, in Spanish) for his safe return and a bright future.  Only this time, he found his position being occupied by a young Lesmes. 

Houses-on-the-Edge-of-Cliff-Cuenca-Spain-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Houses-on-the-Edge-of-Cliff-Cuenca-Spain-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Infuriated and jealous, Julián pulled out his sword and threw himself at Lesmes who instantly unsheathed his sword to defend.  The quiet night was broken by the sharp clash of swords, until Julián lost his footing on one of the steps and fell.  Lesmes took advantage and push his sword through Julián's already shattered heart.  The silence returned.

Soon, the guard came.  In an effort to escape the chase, 
Lesmes tried to jump from a path hid in the leafy forest in the upper city, unraveled a stone and went down to the bottom of the valley.

Inés, guilty of causing two lives, confined herself in the Convento de las Petras for the rest of her life.  To this day, people say her sad spirit still wanders the Convento.

In a UNESCO town that was built by the Moors and later conquered by the Castilians in the 12th century, there's bound to be a lot of stories.  And this is one of them.

Convento-de-las-Petras-Cuenca-Spain-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Convento-de-las-Petras-Cuenca-Spain-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

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