Amazonia

Night Owls of the Amazons - Los Angeles Travel Photographer

It’s early in the morning, we pulled into the thick canopy of the Amazonia. Spotting wildlife is never an easy task here in the Amazons.

It must be our lucky day. The big eyes catching the light filtering through the tree branches were giving it away.

Night-Monkey-Yanallpa-Cano-Amazon-Peru-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Night-Monkey-Yanallpa-Cano-Amazon-Peru-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

As we held our breath and tried to adjust our vision to limited light, we met the curious eyes and the smiley faces (I think) of a family high up in the tree trunk.

Night-Monkey-Family-Yanallpa-Cano-Amazon-Peru-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Night-Monkey-Family-Yanallpa-Cano-Amazon-Peru-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Oh, hello! So nice of you to come say hi after a whole night of fruit-picking and leaf-eating. We are content from meeting the only nocturnal monkeys in the world, owl monkeys. You’ve made our day and you can go back to sleep now.

Recent news about the
Amazon rainforest fires makes me think of you.

Como has estado?

I hope you are doing well, big-eyes!

Subscribe to Receive all Posts in the Email

* indicates required
Email Format

Thanks for the Luck, Red-Capped Cardinal! - Los Angeles Travel Photographer

Earlier this year, I submitted, for the first time, to a photography contest dedicated to the revered 19th century photographer Julia Margaret Cameron.  When I came back from a trip, I was more than delighted (and honored) to see my name in more than one category of the winners' list.   

The image below is one of them.  If you remember, I've posted it before.  Clicking on the image will bring you to it.

Orafo-Goldsmith-in-the-Medieval-Town-of-Pisa-Tuscany-Italy-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Orafo-Goldsmith-in-the-Medieval-Town-of-Pisa-Tuscany-Italy-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

To have a chance out of 4,580 images from 57 countries, I consider myself lucky.  As mom of nature and wildlife photographer Jason Tiesman tells him, "When you see a cardinal, good things are to come".  I do remember seeing such a birdie in la Amazonia last year.  I guess I owe her a debt of gratitude.  Muchas gracias, red-capped cardinal!    

Red-Capped-Cardinal-Yanallpa-Cano-Amazon-Peru-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Red-Capped-Cardinal-Yanallpa-Cano-Amazon-Peru-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Subscribe to Receive all Posts in the Email

* indicates required
Email Format

I Fell In Love with the Peruvian Amazonia Trees - Los Angeles Travel Photographer

As humid as it felt at the time, it was the (beginning of) dry season in the Peruvian Amazonia.  Contrary to my previous conception, many deciduous trees were bare with no leaves left.  Trying to look through the branches to the sky gives an other-worldly (my client Sylvia loves to use this word when describing my work.  Haha...) feeling.  

Yellow-Headed-Caracara-Marayali-Creek-Amazon-Peru-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Yellow-Headed-Caracara-Marayali-Creek-Amazon-Peru-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

You English (-speaking) people may think of the word silhouette (剪影)。  I, on the other hand, see paper-cut (剪纸) in this image.

What do you think?