Indigenous

You Must be a Really Good Photographer - Los Angeles Travel Photographer

We were in the Amazonas village of San Francisco.  While most of the group was occupied by the sugar cane juice squeeze demo, Doc alerted me to a baby girl.  I turned around, our travel mate Michael already assumed position. 

As I raised my camera while seeking optimal angle, I heard Michael's comment, "Jean, you must be a really good photographer.  The baby just smiled for you".  Oh yeah, that's right, the baby smiled, and then laughed, and then laughed really hard.  All of sudden, baby D2 popped into my mind, the 6-month fresh baby that I photographed almost 5 years ago.  

On the day that I met baby D2, he was woken up by grandma from a nap.  Therefore, he was not supposed to be very happy.  But as the photo session progressed, D2 laughed at every word that I said, or what seems to be every noise that I made.  Needless to say, the session was a great success, and the grandma deeply relieved.  At the end, she said, "Jean, you are like a baby whisperer in photography (as opposed to the famous Dog Whisperer in a different profession)".  

Judging from lack of teeth, this baby is at 6-month of age the most.  Throughout my career, it has been an amazing feeling to be connected to these (very) young human co-habitants of earth.  Maybe, underneath my skin, there's a pre-teeth baby hiding? 

On this trip, Peruvian babies/children stole my heart.  More on that later...

Baby-Amazonas-Village-of-San-Francisco-Amazon-Peru-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Baby-Amazonas-Village-of-San-Francisco-Amazon-Peru-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

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This Happened to Me The First Time in My Travels - Los Angeles Travel Photographer

It took some investigating at the bus station to make sure we got on the right bus.  After all, the bus ride that goes into the mountainous area takes four hours and we'd prefer getting off at the planned location when it made the final stop. :-)

At a place where we don't speak Spanish and they don't speak (much, if at all) English, it's back to sign language and basic expressions.  People were really nice and tried to help.  At times, we thought they were going to the same place as we were and tried to have us follow suit.  But there was no way to be sure, until we met a duo of sister and brother.  The sister took a look at our tickets and made a clear enough gesture to let us know we can follow them.  

They carried school backpacks and looked like they were going home for the weekend.  Turned out, their seats were right in front of us, which allowed the younger brother to peek back in between the seats from time to time.  Yes, we look very different from what they have seen in their young lives. :-)  

The way we plan our travels made sure all trips provide visual feasts.  However, a weekend spent in this remote town did something I did not realize until the day we left.  When the bus destined for city took off, I felt something wet rolling down my cheeks.  This had never happened before in my travels.  I only had it happen again when leaving a small town on top of a mountain in the Umbria area of Italy recently. 

Senior-Lady-in-Traditional-Costume-Buying-Cala-Lilies-in-Sunday-Market-of-Cuetzalan-Mexico-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

Senior-Lady-in-Traditional-Costume-Buying-Cala-Lilies-in-Sunday-Market-of-Cuetzalan-Mexico-Copyright-Jean-Huang-Photography

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